Californian workers like you often spend time around appliances, machinery, or other sources of electricity. Even if your precise job doesn’t involve dangerous voltage levels, that doesn’t mean that you will never face the possibility of an electric shock.

FindLaw points out that electrocution is actually one of the most common types of workplace injury, with up to 9 percent of all fatal workplace injuries involving some form of electrocution. Meanwhile, consumers suffer up to 70 fatalities a year due to faulty electrical products.

Electrical injuries themselves can also differ greatly depending on the area that was injured, the voltage behind the shock, how long the electrocution lasted, and even the physical state of the victim. Due to these many factors, any potential source of electric shock should be treated seriously.

Many people who have suffered from electric shock – especially at the workplace – may be wondering if their case is eligible for compensation. This depends on a few factors. First, did someone owe a legal duty to use reasonable care with the electric equipment or wiring that harmed you? Second, did they fail to act responsibly with this duty? Third, did that breach cause your injuries? And fourth, is your injury real and compensable?

This may come as a surprise, but it is actually harder to prove all four of these things than many people think. While you may believe you have an airtight case, you may still benefit from the aid of an attorney, who knows the ins and outs of similar court cases.